French Silk Pie


Today’s recipe is a delicious chocolate french silk pie, but I must warn you that it comes with a disclaimer.  Now this recipe is made with raw eggs, so it is recommended that children, pregnant women, the elderly, and anyone with an immune system disorder not eat this in order to avoid a risk of salmonella food poisoning.  For more info avoiding salmonella poisoning for can check out this link to allrecipes.com.

Now that my warning is out of the way, I must say that raw eggs do not scare me.  As long as you know proper egg safety tips, like the ones listed in the link above, you should be could.  However, I still recommend the groups listed above avoid eating this pie.  I grew up on homemade vanilla ice cream made with raw egg and it hasn’t been a problem for me.  I even think that you could use a pasteurized egg product in it’s place, but I have not tried it.  However, it seems like it should work the same.  If anyone knows if it works, please leave me a comment.

I had seen a recipe similar to this on The Pioneer Woman before.  Her recipe was a little labor intensive, requiring a regular pie crust and melting chocolate.  Then I saw this recipe over at Jamie Cooks It Up who got it from a Betty Crocker cookbook.  The recipe uses a oreo cookie crust and baking cocoa.  It was too simple not to try.  I did serve it to my family with the exception of my daughter who has many health issues, so I didn’t want to risk the raw egg thing with her.  This pie is smooth, creamy, chocolate, satin goodness.  Loved it.  Definitely a keeper.  Thanks Jamie.

French Silk Pie

Recipe disclaimer: This recipe is made with raw eggs so it is recommended that children, pregnant women, the elderly, and anyone with an immune system disorder to avoid a risk of salmonella food poisoning.  For more info avoiding salmonella poisoning for can check out this link to allrecipes.com.

  • 1 C sugar
  • 3/4 C butter, softened (not margarine)
  • 8 T loosely packed cocoa
  • 1 t vanilla
  • 3 eggs (or equal amount of pasteurized eggs to be safe)
  • 1 Oreo cookie crust
  • 1 8oz carton Cool Whip (I used real sweetened whipping cream instead.  I love the real stuff)

1. Mix the sugar and butter together for 4 minutes, until it becomes kind of frothy. (I used the paddle attachment on my kitchen aid)
2. Add the cocoa and vanilla and mix for about 1 minute.
3. Add the eggs one at a time. Mixing for at least 2 minutes after each egg is added.  After the eggs are added it should look nice and fluffy.
4. Spread the mixture into the Oreo crust.
5. Top with cool whip (or whipped cream)
6. Refrigerate for at least an hour, but it’s best if it stays in the fridge over night. This pie also freezes really well.

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15 comments on “French Silk Pie

  • Please do not use raw eggs! My mother-in-law and friends got salmonella from homemade ice cream and it was brutal. One lady was hospitalized. It is not worth the risk! Our school’s home ec teacher switched the class recipe for French silk pie to pasteurized eggs after a warning from the U.S. Agriculture Dept.

  • http://www.safeeggs.com/store-locator
    In shell pasturized eggs. I was wary of trying to use boxed eggs for this recipe b/c if it doesn’t work that is a lot of wasted ingredients, I knew that there was such a thing as pasturized eggs but didn’t know where to get them, until now.
    They had them right at the regular grocery store. I usually do this type of recipe even with my recipe that calls for chocolate squares I just convert to powder and oil. I usually follow my moms recipe which only calls for 1 sq of chocolate and comes out tasting like a three musketeers bar. Very delicious but I wanted to try a more chocolatey one this year. Making this today and freezing for thanksgiving.

  • Using an egg substitute sounds like a good idea. I’m not elderly and have never heard that salmonella chooses it’s victims by age. I suppose the elderly are more susceptible to more viruses/bacteria than younger folks. But I will try the egg substitute in place of real eggs! Thanks for the suggestion Kate!

  • Random question: I am starting mine blog to share your experiences. Do you think it hard or easy to post consistently?

  • A few workers in our area got Salmonella poisoning. It is a good thing that they did not die and they have fully recovered. |

  • I made this pie today for my husband’s birthday- Divine! Everyone at the party raved about how delish it was. So creamy and rich. Thank you for the yummy recipe!

  • I have absolutely nothing against raw eggs either. This pie looks fabulous!

  • I love French Silk Pie! I’ve only made it with melted chocolate so I’ll have to try this easier version. I think we’ve grown super paranoid about raw eggs as a nation and I realized it recently when looking through a baking cookbook from the 1960s. Almost every frosting recipe had raw egg yolks or white in it and now if there’s eggs in a frosting, it’s usually cooked with a hot sugar syrup (although I do make an egg-white chocolate frosting that doesn’t involve cooking). I got squeamish as I looked at those recipes until I realized, wait a minute–I eat French Silk pie and egg nog and those things have raw eggs! Now I’m not so scared about using those frosting recipes.

  • You can use pasteurized eggs just like any other raw egg in a recipe. I work in an assisted living and we use pasteurized eggs in everything we cook or bake. The pie sounds wonderful, I’ll be trying it soon.

  • That looks so creamy and delicious – thanks for sharing!

  • I have successfully used an egg substitute in making a French Silk pie several times. This variation sounds great!

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